nittonarton tomatos

Spring Chores | Repotting Tomato Seedlings

Spring is officially around the corner and the time has come to start thinking about the garden (or balcony). We started the garden season with planting some tomato seeds a couple of weeks ago, well before they can live their life outside. 

So why wouldn’t you simply start your tomatoes in large pots? Because every time you transplant your tomato, you sink the lower portion of its stem deeper into the soil – allowing more roots to form along the newly buried stem. And more roots are a good thing, it gives you a stronger plant and more fruit. 

nittonarton tomato
nittonarton tomatos

From seed to baby plants

Our tomatos began their lives in starting peat pots, now is the time to transplant in to larger 7 centimeter pots. The varieties we are growing this year is tomatos that thrives in pots and don’t get any bigger than 6o centimeters, “Tiny Tim”- a cocktail tomato, and a larger one – “Balkonzauber”. 

nittonarton worm hummus

The extra fuel

Well, you can just go ahead and transplant your plant babies in premium soil, that will give you as good result as any. But we wanted to ramp it up a bit and added some extra goodies to the soil. Tomatos are indeed heavy feeders. Starting with worm humus, which is actually worm poop (!), a very nutritious organic fertilizer and excellent all-round soil improver. For extra strong root development, the soil mix was spiked with mycorrhizal fungi and beneficial bacterias. They are organisms that live symbiotically with roots, protecting against pathogens and encourage an increase in nutrient absorption. With other words: good stuff! Let’s get started with the actual repotting.

nittonarton tomato
nittonarton tomato

Repotting tiny plants

We sow 3-4 seeds in each pot, and this is the result: an average of 3 plants per pot. That’s way to crowded! Carefully separate each plant, making sure that you don’t damage the roots.

nittonarton tomato
nittonarton tomato

Fill your new and larger pots with fresh soil. Make a deep pit in the middle, carefully place the plant in the pit and gently pack the soil. Fill with extra soil on the top if needed. You want to leave some space for water. Give the pot a good final shake to settle everything in.

nittonarton tomato
nittonarton tomato

Your newly transplanted tomato should have a good piece of its stem sunk below the surface. Water deeply down to the lowest roots and only water again when the first layer of the soil feels dry. With a deep-rooted plant, the key is to water less frequently, but more thoroughly. Let them grow at least twice the size before repotting again. Good luck growing your own tomatos!

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